Dokumenta14 Updates #2

It’s the third week since the beginning of the exhibit I’ve been sharing with Valeria and some things have changed, been updated and the like.

First of the likes is the promised dipped skull and it’s development.

that was after 12 dips. I expected a particular kind of development, mostly that after enough layers some kind of face would be developed. Even surprisingly a nose! Though some more needs to be done…the mouth and the horn shouldn’t really be there at all.

Second of likes:

Maybe it’s part of the first likes. Either way it’s the parts that were dipped last week.

This is after the first cycle. They don’t really look spectacular in the first dippings, although you can see the skull then compared to the skull now.

Tomorrow, I will make a mother post about the upgrade to the animatronics.

 

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Infuratiation

So I have a 3d printer I designed myself. It’s a machine I planned to use, to make a little cash here and there and help me with machine projects. It also helped me release other realities, namely how you’re never really an engineer unless you’ve built something….completely wrong. Anyways, thats a discussion for another day. 3d printing is a FDM (fused deposited material) process, or an additive process. You’re building something from the ground up to the geometry you want, not taking something and cutting it away until you have said geometry. In 3d printings case, I taking a PLA (a corn based plastic) and melt it like a gluegun and accurately move it around until my object is built. Unfortunately, melting things usually released particles and gases from within melted thing. Plastic of course is no different and these particulates bother me. Though some people on the internets seem to thing that it’s perfectly fine, No worse than breathing smoke from frying foods….buuuut those are internet people and as far as safety goes. as long as you feel safe, and I don’t feel safe just plainly breathing plastic particulates.

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3d printed Encoder

A customer of mine at the University of Kassel namely the Electric Motors and Drives institute asked me to print them some parts to mount an encoder they needed to test with one of their dspace control boxes they were having issues with. They required a mount for the electronics onto a super high RPM motor they had lying around (10k rpm) and for the magnetic encoder ring onto the shaft.

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